our Mood is Upset? You May Be Vitamin D Deficient

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WARTAINDONESIA EN – Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is essential for bone health, muscle health, and immune system health. Vitamin D can be obtained from food, supplements, and sunlight.

Vitamin D deficiency can occur due to a number of factors, including:

  • Lack of exposure to sunlight
  • Having dark skin
  • Having certain medical conditions, such as kidney or liver disease
  • Taking certain medications, such as corticosteroids

Vitamin D deficiency can lead to a number of health problems, including:

  • Osteoporosis
  • Rickets
  • Muscle weakness
  • Chronic pain
  • Fatigue

However, did you know that vitamin D deficiency can also lead to mood changes, such as depression, anxiety, and irritability?

Mood swings as one of the signs of vitamin D deficiency

Mood swings are one of the signs of vitamin D deficiency. This is because vitamin D plays an important role in brain function, including mood regulation.

A study published in the journal Journal of Affective Disorders in 2013 found that adults with vitamin D deficiency are more likely to experience depression. Another study published in the journal Depression and Anxiety in 2014 found that adults with vitamin D deficiency are more likely to experience anxiety.

Vitamin D deficiency can disrupt brain function

Vitamin D plays an important role in a number of brain functions, including:

  • Neurogenesis
  • Brain development
  • Mood regulation
  • Cognitive function

If vitamin D levels in the body are low, then these brain functions can be disrupted. This can lead to mood changes, such as depression, anxiety, and irritability.

How to increase vitamin D levels

There are a number of things that can be done to increase vitamin D levels in the body, including:

  • Sunbathing for 15-20 minutes each day. Sunlight is the best natural source of vitamin D.
  • Eating foods that are rich in vitamin D, such as salmon, tuna, sardines, beef liver, and egg yolks.
  • Taking vitamin D supplements. A doctor will determine the best way to increase vitamin D levels in your body, depending on the severity of your vitamin D deficiency.**

Tips for increasing vitamin D levels

Here are some tips for increasing vitamin D levels:

  • Sunbathe in the morning, when the sun is not too strong.
  • Sunbathe with exposed skin, so that the skin can absorb sunlight well.
  • Use sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to protect your skin from harmful ultraviolet rays.
  • Eat foods that are rich in vitamin D, such as salmon, tuna, sardines, beef liver, and egg yolks.
  • If you are at risk of vitamin D deficiency, consult with a doctor about taking vitamin D supplements.

Vitamin D and depression

Depression is a mental disorder that is characterized by feelings of sadness, loss of interest, and excessive fatigue. Depression can affect various aspects of a person’s life, including relationships, work, and health.

A study published in the journal Lancet in 2017 found that adults with vitamin D deficiency are more likely to experience depression. The study involved more than 100,000 people from 26 countries.

Another study published in the journal Journal of Affective Disorders in 2013 found that adults with depression have lower vitamin D levels than adults who do not have depression.

Vitamin D and anxiety

Anxiety is a mental disorder that is characterized by feelings of fear, worry, and excessive nervousness. Anxiety can affect various aspects of a person’s life, including sleep, eating, and relationships.

A study published in the journal Depression and Anxiety in 2014 found that adults with vitamin D deficiency are more likely to experience anxiety. The study involved more than 5,000 people from the United States.

Another study published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology in 2016 found that adults with anxiety have lower vitamin D levels than adults who do not have anxiety.

Vitamin D and other mood changes

In addition to depression and anxiety, vitamin D deficiency can also be associated with other mood changes, such as irritability, anger, and loss of interest in activities that are normally enjoyed.

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